Let me repeat myself

My morning newsfeed from Brain Pickings presented me with Amanda Palmer reading the Polish Nobel Laureate Wislawa download (12)Szymborksa’s poem, “Possibilities,”  The poem is written using a poetic device called “repetition.”  The repetition is obvious,  at the start of each line Szmborska is using the very same phrase.  After a while, the repetition sets an expectation much like metrical predictability.  Variation from the expected length is noticeable, but a nice break from the shorter lines.  Still, the poem’s length, and the absolute focus upon the phrase, “I prefer” drives the reader into a sense of knowing what to expect which feels “safe.”  This safety feeling, in my opinion, is an interesting juxtaposition to some of the brave risks she talks about within the poem itself.

While a reader who is unfamiliar with non-rhyming, non-metrical works as “poetry,” might not necessarily classify this work as 1318947739_Colourfull-dragonflya poem, the work fits many of the definitions of what a poem is.  This piece qualifies as a poem because it is using sonic devices, such as repetition, to “achieve an incantatory effect.”  It’s using this musical quality to balance the fearsomeness of some of the ideas Szmborska presents.  It twists language a bit, like the phrases “the time of insects and the time of stars.”

These are some of the reasons I wanted to make sure I brought this device, as well as her poem, to your attention.  But onto some of the technical details, like what repetition as a poetic device is, and how it’s used.

Repetition as a poetic device which Bob’s summarizes quite nicely:

A basic artistic device, fundamental to any conception of poetry. It is a highly effective unifying force; the repetition of sound, syllables, words, syntactic elements, lines, stanzaic forms, and metrical patterns establishes cycles of expectation which are reinforced with each successive fulfillment.

Sidelight: Repetition is so important to poetry that a large number of poetic devices are based on its different applications. Sometimes variations from the expected repetitions can also achieve a significant effect.

And here are some links on the use of repetition in poetry.

a blog called udemy
Literary Devices
Wikipedia
Al Filreis’s Uni of PA has a lot of references and poems where the device is used

The Poetry Foundation doesn’t have a direct reference to the word “repetition,” but has a definition for “refrain” which one should be familiar with as that is a specific implementation of repetition in a formulaic manner.


 

And before you get to the poem, I’d like to remind you of Robert Lewis Stevenson’s famous quote from his Inland Voyage because when I read Szmborska’s poem it came immediately to mind.

To know what you prefer instead of humbly saying Amen to what the world tells you you ought to prefer, is to have kept your soul alive.

So here is Amanda Palmer reading Polish Nobel Laureate Wislawa Szmborksa’s poem, “Possibilities” and the Brain Picking’s article with the poem embedded, but here it is and cited from the Nobel site:

Possibilities

I prefer movies.
I prefer cats.
I prefer the oaks along the Warta.
I prefer Dickens to Dostoyevsky.
I prefer myself liking people
to myself loving mankind.
I prefer keeping a needle and thread on hand, just in case.
I prefer the color green.
I prefer not to maintain
that reason is to blame for everything.
I prefer exceptions.
I prefer to leave early.
I prefer talking to doctors about something else.
I prefer the old fine-lined illustrations.
I prefer the absurdity of writing poems
to the absurdity of not writing poems.
I prefer, where love’s concerned, nonspecific anniversaries
that can be celebrated every day.
I prefer moralists
who promise me nothing.
I prefer cunning kindness to the over-trustful kind.
I prefer the earth in civvies.
I prefer conquered to conquering countries.
I prefer having some reservations.
I prefer the hell of chaos to the hell of order.
I prefer Grimms’ fairy tales to the newspapers’ front pages.
I prefer leaves without flowers to flowers without leaves.
I prefer dogs with uncropped tails.
I prefer light eyes, since mine are dark.
I prefer desk drawers.
I prefer many things that I haven’t mentioned here
to many things I’ve also left unsaid.
I prefer zeroes on the loose
to those lined up behind a cipher.
I prefer the time of insects to the time of stars.
I prefer to knock on wood.
I prefer not to ask how much longer and when.
I prefer keeping in mind even the possibility
that existence has its own reason for being.

 

By Wislawa Szymborskadownload (15)
From “Nothing Twice”1997
Translated by S. Baranczak & C. Cavanagh

Copyright © Wislawa Szymborska, S. Baranczak & C. Cavanagh

 

 

 

Edward Hirsch on “How to Read a Poem”

After one bit of commentary on one of my poems referenced it taking more than one pass to grasp what was going on, I found it oddly synchronous when Brain Pickings referenced this book in an article I read. While I haven’t read Hirsch’s book, I did run across this article he published in 2007 in conjunction with poets.org & The Great Books foundation.  It is a concise article which is remarkably jargon free and simply written:  How to Read a Poem
Hirsch opens with a clear statement of assumptions people make when faced with reading poetry,

“Most readers make three false assumptions when addressing an unfamiliar poem. The first is assuming that they should understand what they encounter on the first reading, and if they don’t, that something is wrong with them or with the poem. The second is assuming that the poem is a kind of code, that each detail corresponds to one,
and only one, thing, and unless they can crack this code, they’ve missed the point. The third is assuming that the poem can mean anything readers want it to mean.”

This little article breaks down the mechanics quite neatly to those who don’t want to spend months, or even years, reading books about the technicalities of the craft.  But better than that, he addresses some of the inherent ambiguities of crafting a poem – one of the most powerful, I believe, is that a poem can be “more than the sum of its parts” and might reveal “ideas that may not have been foremost in the writer’s mind in the moment of composition.”

This latter part is one of the qualities which the reader brings to the poem.  How the reader might actually be participating in the making of the poem, the way an actor participates in the making of a play.

I can say for my part that there are often times where no matter how starkly I write about an actual experience, a reader will bring another connotation out from under the bushes and place it at my doorstep that I would never before have imagined.