The Rhyme Which Dare Not Speak Its Name

This week’s poetry kick in the pants deals with a different kind of rhyme, one which relies on the use of either homonyms, homophones, heteronyms, or homographs.  Write a poem of no fewer than 10 lines using a pattern which employs the use of homonyms, homophones, heteronyms, or homographs.  There is no specific rhyme scheme.  Both internal and end rhyme are allowed.

From Bob’s Byway:

HOMONYM:  One of two or more words which are identical in pronunciation and spelling, but different in  meaning, as the noun bear and the verb bear.

Sidelight:  Although often called  homonyms in popular usage (indeed, in some dictionaries as well), homophones are words which are identical in pronunciation but  different in meaning or derivation or spelling, as rite, write, right, and wright, or rain and reign. Heteronyms are words which are identical in spelling but different in meaning and pronunciation, as sow, to scatter seed, and sow, a female hog. Homographs are words which  are identical  in spelling but different in meaning and derivation or pronunciation, as pine, to yearn for, and pine, a tree, or the bow of a ship and a bow and arrow.

I first started getting interested in this type of rhyming when trying to conquer the sestina, which is another poetic form where the last word of a line in a six line stanza is then repeated in a specific order in the following stanzas.  Now that’s a lot of writing and we’ll take that on another week – insert lash lick here- but I bring that up because that would be a good poetic form to look at in reference to how to work out this piece.  But we’re not going to go that far this week.  I bring it up because you might want to work a limited version.

Here’s some word lists to help with the prompt:

homophones
heteronyms
homonyms
homographs

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